speech

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Today we are meeting a special woman, a wonderful woman, a pioneer. She is the first African American woman who has risen to such a powerful status in the American Politics. From a little town in Birmingham she is now a strong voice in Washington D.C. She came from a black ghetto and is now part of a democratic government. She comes from a world of terror and is now is fighting for world peace. She doesn't care only for her people but represents everyone.

Condoleezza Rice the woman who made this difference hasn't stopped to rest. She is a woman of many actions. professor of business and political science at Stanford University and the Thomas and Barbara Stephenson Senior Fellow on Public Policy at the Hoover Institution . She's a singer, a piano player , and loves to play golf as well.

We should all follow her lead. We should have her energies to get up and fight for what we believe in.

I am proud to present the one and only Condoleezza Rice.


Interview



1. How was it to grow up in America as a black girl?

It was very hard. I have learned about the dark side when she was just eight years old. I remember feeling the earth shake when a Baptist church was bombed by racists one Sunday morning just two miles from my home. The victims were all young black girls.
Four girls died in the bombing and the incident had a major effect on me.
I knew those little girls. Denise McNair was my little friend from kindergarten,. I was a playmate and I just couldn't believe that she was dead. She was not, of course, the only one. Addie Mae Collins was in my uncle's homeroom in school. These were innocent children, this was homegrown terrorism, I know a little bit of what it's like to have somebody try to terrorize a community. These little girls weren't going to hurt anybody. They didn't have any political power. This was just meant to terrorize the community.



2. In your childhood what do you think shaped you in to what you are now?

"I grew up in Birmingham back in the days when it acquired the name
"Bomb-ingham", when even with my strong protective family you had to wonder why they were doing this to us? Why all this terror? Why all this favoritism? All this gave me a personal understanding of what the dark side of human beings can look like and as well the ability of people to get over the dark side of human beings."



3. Why did you decide to become a politician?

"Well, growing up in the South and having people underestimate you because one of the reasons for segregation, one of the reasons for the separation of the races was supposedly, the inferiority of one race to the other And so when I look around the world and I hear people say, 'Well, you know, they're just not ready for democracy,' it really does resonate. I hear echoes of, well, you know, blacks are kind of childlike. They really can't handle the vote. Or they really can't take care of themselves. It really does roil me. It makes me so angry because I think there are those echoes of what people once thought about black Americans."
Its the same argument I use to defend the difficult war in Iraq and the Bush administration's goal of spreading democracy around the world.


4. At which point in your life did you decide that you want to make a change in the country?

Oh, It's a good question. well, when I grew up I was exposed to all the hatred in the world, all wars and I decided that it's not a way to live and I want to make a change in the world.

5. What was it like for you, as the first African-American woman to become Secretary of State?”
I was very proud and grateful to be the first African-American woman in the position. I thought it said a lot about our country that we had back-to-back African-American Secretaries of State, Colin Powell and then me. I also thought it said a lot about President Bush that he didn’t see limits on the highest ranking diplomat in terms of color. It’s a hard job, but really the best one in government

6. Do you feel like you have more support or more criticism about your work?

Depends. Some people say a lot of good things and are very supportive, but on the other hand there are also lots of reviews about what I do. But I get the reviews and check and try to correct myself if I see necessary.


7. Do you feel that you have contributed to women's position in the USA?

I think so, I think it shows them that women have a lot of power and influence
and that they should strive for more.

8. At which point in your future do you see yourself out of politics?

I'v never been the "long-term plan" kind of person, so will see…


9. What other accomplishments have you done in your life?

Writing was always very important for me, I like to see my life in an outside way. Publishing three books is a great accomplishment for me and I hope that my story will inspire others to dream high

Condi: The Condoleezza Rice Story Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family Condoleezza Rice: A Memoir of My Extraordinary, Ordinary Family and Me

10. Can you tell us some of the goals that you hope to reach in the future?

'To leave the world not just safer but better".


Thank u very much Miz Rice fore your time


Rationale

The class chose to write about Women of Valor, we chose to write about Condoleezza Rice because we see in here a woman who diden't just work hard and got hereself to be one of the strong voice in American Politics. She also pave a way for women in men's world and for her as a black woman it was much harder and by her success she made a change.

In this work we wanted to learn how she started, what her beliefs were that conducted her.



Identity card _תעודת_זהות.jpg


Full name: Condoleezza (Condie) Rice

Parent's names: John Wesley Rice and his wife,
Angelena Ray.

Year of birth: November 14, 1954

Where born: Birmingham, Alabama,

Place of work: United States Secretary of State,

Location: Washington, D.C.

Profession: professor, politician, diplomat , political scienceand author

What she is famous for: She is the National Security Advisor for President Goerge W. Bush.


Biography


Condoleezza Rice was born on November 14th, 1954 iAlabama, daughter to John Wesley Rice and his wife, Angelena Ray. Rice is the the National Security Advisor for President George W. Bush, working now as the United States Secretary of State, Washington, D.C.. She has many professions, such as a professor, politician, diplomat, political science and author.
Growing up in America as a n Birmingham, black girl It was very hard. Back In the days when Birmingham acquired the name "Bomb-ingham" at the age of eight she had to learned about the dark side. She remembers feeling the earth shake when a Baptist church was bombed by racists one Sunday morning just two miles from my home. The victims were all young black girls.
Four girls died in the bombing and the incident had a major effect on her.
She knew those little girls. Denise McNair was her little friend from kindergarten. She was a playmate and Rice just couldn't believe that she was dead. She was not, of course, the only one. Addie Mae Collins was in Rice uncle's homeroom in school. These were innocent children, this was homegrown terrorism, Rice know a little bit of what it's like to have somebody try to terrorize a community. These little girls weren't going to hurt anybody. They didn't have any political power. This was just meant to terrorize the community. even with her strong protective family she had to wonder why they were doing this to them? Why all this terror? Why all this favoritism? All this gave her a personal understanding of what the dark side of human beings can look like and as well the ability of people to get over the dark side of human beings.

From this childhood we can see what lead her to one of the the grate politition around. Growing up in the South and having people underestimate her because one of the reasons for segregation, one of the reasons for the separation of the races was supposedly, the inferiority of one race to the other, .So when she looked around the world and she heard people say, 'Well, you know, they're just not ready for democracy,' it really does resonate. She heard echoes of, well, you know, blacks are kind of childlike. They really can't handle the vote. Or they really can't take care of themselves. It really does roil her. It makes her so angry because she thinks there are those echoes of what people once thought about black Americans.
It's the same argument she uses to defend the difficult war in Iraq and the Bush administrations goal of spreading democracy around the world.
From this point when she was exposed to all the hatred in the world and all wars and she decided that it's not a way to live and that she want to make a change in the world.

With all the pride for being the first African-American woman to become Secretary of State, yet she get the reviews ` the good and so the bad, checks and tries to correct herself if she sees necessary. She has definitely contributed to women's position in the USA and she tryies to show them that women have a lot of power and influence and that they should strive for more.
Will, all this succeed do you think its enough? This woman have done more accomplishments in here life, Publishing three book with a lot of hope that here story will inspire others to dream high.

She is deffinately a woman of valor, so when you'll ask her for one goal she hope to reach in the futuer she'll say:
"To leave the world not just safer but better"